Students eat lunch on the Oxford quad.

Our Campus

More than 180 years ago, when a small group of Methodists founded a college along with the new town of Oxford, Georgia, they envisioned a utopia far from big city temptations. "A place to foster spiritual uplift and education without any distraction, " wrote Gary Hauk in his history of Emory, "A Legacy of Heart and Mind: Emory since 1836."

When Emory College moved to Atlanta in 1915 to become part of the new Emory University, its Oxford campus remained functional and viable, persisting through a variety of formats including its most successful and enduring turn into the two-year undergraduate liberal arts college it is today.

36
miles east of downtown Atlanta
993
total students
4
residential communities

A Transformative Decade

Since 2005 about 60% of the buildings on Oxford's campus have been renovated or built. Oxford's compact but vibrant campus means that you're never more than a five-minute walk from where you need to go—your classrooms, the library, the dining hall, or the student center and gym. The walkability of our campus and the surrounding area is one of our best features.

354
campus acres
1.2 miles
length of Hearn Nature Trail on Oxford's campus

Campus Building Highlights

Sitting at the center of campus under a beautiful canopy of trees is Oxford's Quad, crisscrossed with red brick walkways. It's where generations of Oxford students have studied, daydreamed, played, and graduated. Around the Quad you'll find these and other buildings:

Tarbutton Performing Arts Center

Tarbutton Performing Arts Center

Houses a theater as well as rehearsal, studio, and classroom space. It's where the entire community gathers for performances, lectures, and other events.

Oxford Library

Oxford Library

Recently restructured and rebuilt with the needs of today’s students in mind, with classroom, research, and collaboration space in addition to many kinds of digital resources.

Dining Hall

Dining Hall

Everyone on campus eats here, even the dean. Dining Services has a commitment to sustainable food with locally grown ingredients you’ll be able to eat by the beautiful fireplace.

Seney Hall

Seney Hall

Named for a Northern banker who donated money without ever visiting campus, inspired by a speech by then-Emory College president Atticus G. Haywood; Oxford's most iconic building.

Phi Gamma Hall

Phi Gamma Hall

Emory University's oldest building (some say it’s haunted). Throughout its history, Phi Gamma has served a multitude of functions. It’s now a meeting and event space.

Science Building

Science Building

A state-of-the-art facility that enhances Oxford's robust science curriculum and the experiences of our students, who tend to pursue graduate STEM programs at high rates.

Student Center

Student Center

The first building in the history of our campus to be built specifically to support the life of students outside the classroom.