Latin American and Caribbean Studies

LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN STUDIES 101: INTRODUCTION TO LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES (HSC)

Fall, Spring. Credit, three hours. An interdisciplinary introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean and to the Latin American and Caribbean Studies program at Oxford College. The course provides historical background and familiarizes students with contemporary political, social, economic, and cultural issues.

LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN STUDIES 261 / HISTORY 261 / MUSIC 261: LATIN AMERICAN MUSIC AND GLOBALIZATION (HSC)

Spring. Credit, three hours. Latin American and Caribbean societies' process of globalization from the perspective of their musical practices, from colonial to present times, and the circulation of music across national and cultural boundaries, within and beyond this region. Intended for students pursuing majors, minors, and concentrations in Latin American and Caribbean Studies, History, and Music.

LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN STUDIES 262 / HISTORY 262: PROGRESS IN LATIN AMERICA (HAP)

Spring. Credit, three hours. Prerequisite: Any course in History, Philosophy or Anthropology is recommended. The goal of "progress," the concept of "development," and the elaboration of the "future" in Latin America since the times of the Iberian reformism in the 18th century to the 20th century and current debates. The course deals with the problem of "historical time" and of conceptualizing the entire region, and serves students pursuing majors, minors, and concentrations in Latin American and Caribbean Studies, History, and Social Sciences.

LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN STUDIES 270: TOPICS: LATIN AMERICAN ISSUES (HSC)

Fall, Spring. Credit, three hours. An exact match of the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Topics course at ECAS, offering pilot courses on particular topics that may develop into stand-alone courses.

LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN STUDIES 362: HISTORY OF THE CARRIBEAN (HSC)

TBA. Credit, three hours. History of the cultural, intellectual, and artistic expressions of the Caribbean as they relate to the forced and voluntary encounters of Native, European, and African peoples and the socioeconomic structures of global capitalism since the 15th century. It serves both as its homonymous course at ECAS and as complement to Spanish 335.